Cycling Accident and Injury

We cover all cycling accidents, including the following:

Compensation can vary depending on a number of factors, including the severity of the injury, and we have experience in the following Injury Types:

At Cycle Lawyer we pride ourselves on service.  We’ll guide you through the process and you’ll always have a direct line through to your personal solicitor who will be able to fully explain the process and answer any questions you may have.

All cases are different, but if you have any questions then call one of our specialist Cycle claims solicitors for a no-obligation consultation on 01446 794199.

Cycling Accident Frequently Asked Questions

What about my bike?

Our bikes are often our pride and joy (sorry kids).  If yours is damaged in an accident that wasn’t your fault then you’re entitled to have it repaired or replaced at no cost to you.

People who don’t ride often don’t realise how technical, and therefore expensive, modern bikes can be and this is an often-disputed area of personal injury claims for cyclists.

As riders, we know the law but we also know about bikes so we can make sure that when your ready to get back to riding, your bike is repaired or replaced and ready to go.

Free consolation with a real “solicitor”

If you’ve had an accident when out cycling, one of our real solicitors will always be happy to have a chat to tell you what your options are for making a claim.

We say “real solicitors” because lots of law firms dress up unqualified staff with fancy job titles that make them sound like solicitors when they’re not so they can use lower skilled staff to run your case. 

"Paralegal", "litigator", "litigation executive", "case handler", none of these job titles requires the person to have any specialist legal qualifications or experience, whatsoever.

The legally protected term in the UK is “solicitor” and, like the word “doctor”, it’s illegal to call yourself one if you’re not.

At Cycling Lawyer, everyone who has conduct of a claim on behalf of a client is a fully qualified solicitor and it makes all the difference.

Does wearing a helmet affect my claim?

It won’t affect your ability to make a successful claim but if you weren't wearing a helmet, it may have an impact on the amount of compensation that you get if you’ve suffered a head injury.  Any deduction would be limited to 25% though and the burden of proof is on the defendant to show, with evidence from a medical expert, that your not wearing the helmet, specifically contributed to the severity of the injury.

Should I wear high viz? Does dark clothing matter?

You’re not required to wear high viz clothing when cycling, and the often stated defence of "I didn’t see you" holds no water.  You are more likely to be seen in bright colours, and the highway code suggests that you might want to consider it, but not doing so doesn’t change the legal position if you get knocked off and need to make a claim.

Do I need lights?

You do if you want to ride in the dark. It’s illegal not to have front and rear lights lit. It’s worth noting that if your bike was made after 1985, which is the vast majority of bikes, it’s also mandatory to have reflectors on if you’re riding after dark.

Can I ride 2 abreast?

Yes, you can, though the Highway Code says you should revert to single file when the road becomes narrow or if you’re going round a corner with a restricted view.

Do I need a lawyer?

It depends on what you mean by "need".  Technically you don’t require a lawyer to initiate a personal injury claim after a cycling accident, but a specialist lawyer can make all the difference to the amount of compensation you get. 

Defendant insurers love to deal with your claim “without the need for a lawyer” because they can give you less compensation than you’re entitled to.  They even have a name for this practice, the somewhat sinister “Third-party capture”. 

If you’re thinking that being captured by anyone doesn’t sound like it’s in your interest, read on to see why you’re completely right…

The adversarial system

In England and Wales, we have an adversarial law system.  There are two opposing sides that want opposite outcomes (you want to have the most money, them to give you the least).  The two parties try to take advantage of each other, because that’s the idea. Defendant insurers tell litigants in person that their interests are aligned with yours, but they’re really trying to take advantage of your lack of legal representation.

What if they offer me money?

If you bring a claim yourself then (subject to their insured driver obviously having caused the accident) the defendant insurer will try to give you “some” money to settle. This will be as quickly as possible, with as few questions asked as possible. 

So far so good, except the idea is that its quick and dirty, and you can never go back for more if you accept their offer.  This is where the problems come in, because when you find out what you might have been entitled to, you will want more. 

It’s interesting to note that they couldn’t take advantage of their own insured person in this way because that person would be protected by such sharp practice by the Financial Ombudsman.

Sadly, you, as a litigant in person, are considered to be their opponent, and therefore fair game.

Fair game. That can’t be fair!

And it isn’t. Happily, the courts know this too. Because there would be such an obvious imbalance if they allowed one side a specialist lawyer and not the other, your right to have legal representation (or “parity of arms” as the law calls it) is baked into the legal system at every stage… unless you can be convinced not to take up that right.

No win, no fee

Can’t afford to pay for a lawyer up front? No problem, most people can’t.  No-win, no-fee agreements were implemented by the ministry of justice so you wouldn’t have to be at a disadvantage, and thus enabling you to get the damages you’re entitled to.

So… do I really “need” a lawyer?

Defendant insurers want to “capture” you because they know that when you have a specialist lawyer, the window for them to take advantage of you has closed.

Have you ever watched a police show on TV and seen the detective trying to take advantage of a person they’ve arrested before they “lawyer up”.  A “great deal” is offered but only if the person takes it immediately, and it's off the table if they check whether it really is a great deal with a lawyer.  How does that usually end up?

At Cycling Lawyer we pride ourselves on service.  We’ll guide you through the process and you’ll always have a direct line through to your personal solicitor who will be able to fully explain the process and answer any questions you may have.

All cases are different, but if you have any questions then call one of our specials Cycle claims solicitors for a no-obligation consultation on 01446 794199.